Behavioral & Emotional Topics:

Emotional Development

The Title IV-E Program offers free trainings to San Francisco Human Services Agency staff who work with youth in foster care, group home staff, foster family agency staff, and foster parents in San Francisco.  

Most classes can be offered at an agency’s site on weekdays, evenings, or Saturdays with a minimum of 8 guaranteed participants attending the training.  Agencies can select topics from the currently offered list or request new workshops.  Our faculty can customize workshops that fit your agency's needs.

For eligibility questions and more information about scheduling classes, please contact fcstrain@ccsf.edu.

To register for Title IV-E classes email fcstrain@ccsf.edu.  

 

Anxiety & Panic Disorders
Learn about the anxiety disorders listed in DSM-IV: generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), phobias and social anxiety disorder (also known as social phobia), selective mutism, panic disorder with and without agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety secondary to medical condition, acute stress disorder (ASD), and substance-induced anxiety disorder. This three-hour class covers diagnosis, the impact each diagnosis can have on functioning, cultural and gender considerations, and common treatments.

Anxiety Disorders: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder & PTSD

Bipolar Disorder

Learn to discern the difference between bipolar symptoms and symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, drug abuse, schizophrenia, and other mental health problems. Study intervention strategies and commonly used medications.

Emotional & Behavioral Issues: Helping Youth with Emotional & Behavioral Challenges
Discuss ways of working with youth within the context of family systems and past histories of trauma, neglect, or attachment disruption. Examine the importance of understanding and validating client feelings while working to enhance client capabilities and behavioral skills, decreasing behaviors that interfere with the client’s safety or quality of life, and restructuring residential milieus to increase motivational factors and improve client responses to treatment. Explore how caregivers can help clients “self-regulate,” or learn to recognize and control emotions which might lead to counter-productive behaviors

Emotional Intelligence : How to Foster EI in Youth

Emotional Intelligence, as stated by Daniel Goleman is “….the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivation ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.” At this workshop, discuss the components of emotional intelligence and how to help yourself and others in raising their EQ, Emotional Quotient.

Emotional & Behavioral Disorders of Childhood & Adolescents: An Overview
Examine behavior and its relationship to identifying emotional problems in children and youth.  Review a variety of theories and diagnostic labels that help explain or identify emotional problems and study how these can be helpful or harmful to treatment. Discuss assessment in understanding emotional problems and the use of DSM-IV in diagnosing youth.

Emotional & Developmental Impact on Victims of Physical Abuse, Neglect, or Sexual Abuse

Emotional Intelligence: Fostering Emotional Intelligence 

Emotional Intelligence, as stated by Daniel Goleman is “….the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivation ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.” Discuss the components of emotional intelligence and how to help yourself and others in raising their EQ, Emotional Quotient.

Facilitated Emotional Problem Solving

Interventions to Help Youth Heal

Mood Disorders: Depression & Bipolar Disorder

Review diagnostic criteria for both disorders, how to rule out other mental health diagnoses with similar clinical presentations, and will teach participants effective treatment strategies for these problems.

Therapy: The Benefits of Youth in Therapy
Examine the differences between individual therapy, counseling, and milieu work. Explore the benefits gained by youth in out- of-home placement who participate in the therapeutic process and helpful strategies for reducing the negative stigma youth associate with therapy while supporting their underlying vulnerabilities. You may bring case examples of specific clients for discussion of techniques and tools that may help youth feel safe enough to disclose their feelings to staff.  Review the role of attachment and bonding as it relates to your comfort levels when having counseling encounters with clients. Finally, learn when to refer clients to therapy groups or individual therapy.

Understanding Children Placed in Out of Home Care
For better or worse, removing children from their homes often causes yet another set of traumas for the youth. While this may be necessary for the youth’s safety, it is important to understand the mixture of feelings our kids struggle with and the kinds of connections they have to their immediate and extended family members (dead or alive). Learn to use your own ability to empathize in a manner that helps our youth work through past traumas as well as their current trauma of living outside their familiar communities. A strength-based perspective is promoted.

Working with Youth in Residential Treatment
Many foster youth have emotional and behavioral issues related to their backgrounds that require specialized understanding and approaches in working with them. Review the impact of trauma on foster youth and emotional and behavioral consequences for them. Discuss effective program approaches, including youth development principles, the importance of the relationship, using strengths based approaches, and building communication, coping and social skills. Examine some behavioral interventions for working with youth.