Natalie Thoreson

Cultural Competency in Work with Youth
Learn cultural competency concepts and the necessary skills to provide the best support for youth in care, including the development of a safe, affirming environment for youth regardless of their ability, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, race, religion, or cultures of origin. Develop a deeper understanding of one another across varying identities; examine how our individual identities may be perceived and effect our interaction with the youth we serve. Explore basic definitions of oppression, discrimination, prejudice, stereotypes, social power, and oppression through activities and group dialogue. Through increased exposure to terminology used in diversity related discourse, increase your personal skills in cross-cultural communication. Challenge yourself to cultivate Critical Consciousness as you participate in large and small group dialogue and self-reflection.



Unearthing & Combatting Micro-agressions* in Work with Youth

Micro-aggressions are brief, commonplace, and frequently unconscious, verbal, behavioral, or environmental acts of discrimination. Examine the cumulative impacts of a lifetime micro-aggressions, which may seem harmless as individual incidents, on youth-in-care. Explore tools to combat micro-aggressions on institutional, individual, and cultural levels. Our goal is to examine, unearth, and devise tools to combat micro-aggressions on institutional, individual and cultural levels.

Explore:

•    How micro-aggressions are learned and how to begin unearthing the socialization that leads to micro-aggressions
•    The effects of micro-aggressions on co-workers as well as youth in care
•    Our own experiences of being targets or perpetuators of micro-aggressions
•    Ideas to support a more inclusive community through combatting micro-aggressions

*micro-aggression - The term “micro-aggression” was used by Columbia professor Derald Sue to refer to “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.” Sue borrowed the term from psychiatrist Dr. Chester Pierce who coined the term in the 1970s.



Understanding Gender Oppression to Support Transgender and Gender-Variant Youth

Explore your understanding of and assumptions related to sex, gender, and gender identity. Discuss the ways that the binary system of masculine and feminine results in micro-aggressions* toward transgender and gender-variant youth. Develop the skills and the methodology needed to provide safe spaces for transgender and gender-variant youth in care and in our workplaces and communities.

Examine gender oppression and how it impacts transgender and gender-variant individuals through lecture, activities, personal reflection, observation, dialogue and practice.  Learn basic terminology related to gender and gender oppression. Practice dialogue tools and techniques necessary to support and engage dialogue and action aimed at interrupting gender oppression within the care system, our workplaces, and our larger communities.

*micro-aggression - The term “micro-aggression” was used by Columbia professor Derald Sue to refer to “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.” Sue borrowed the term from psychiatrist Dr. Chester Pierce who coined the term in the 1970s.