Noncredit Syllabus

CCSF Faculty Handbook, Section 4.7. Instructors are “to give each student pertinent written information” including your name, course and section on the board and syllabus, learning outcomes, required materials, and subject matter to be covered. There are additional items on the list for credit classes. (The Faculty Handbook is a link from the main CCSF webpage under Employee Services, Human Resources, Handbooks.)

A noncredit syllabus should include:

  1. Instructor Name
  2. Course Name:  Title and Level
  3. Required materials for study – Use “The textbook for this class is . . .” because textbooks cannot be required.
  4. Subject matter to be covered
  5. Optional:  How students will be assessed (daily observation, completion of in-class assignments)
  6. Official Student Learning Outcomes (refer to Course Outline of Record)
  7. Recommended information: Certificates associated with the course and recommendation to students to attend class regularly

Literacy and Low Beginning Level students will not be able to read the syllabus, however, as required by the WASC Commission, it is our public responsibility to publish our student learning outcomes whether or not the student can understand them. Our Department SLOs are posted online through the CCSF website, which has a multi-language translation capability.


Noncredit Program Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify main ideas and key details in oral discourse in a variety of contexts.
  2. Use vocabulary and structures to produce oral discourse.
  3. Identify main ideas and key details in written discourse in a variety of contexts.
  4. Use vocabulary and structures to produce written discourse.

Noncredit ESL students can progress from literacy classes through low advanced classes. Students can also focus on certain skills such as listening, speaking, reading, or writing as they progress through the noncredit program. In addition, Noncredit ESL provides career and technical pathways for students who are interested in English for job preparation. Finally, there are classes for students who want to prepare for the citizenship test. Below are updated student learning outcomes based on California Adult Education Standards, upon which our individual course student learning outcomes is based. See the  The Noncredit ESL Course Assessment Process .

Noncredit ESL Pathways Student Learning Outcomes
Literacy student learning outcomes

  • Recognize a limited range of simple spoken isolated words, phrases and questions.
  • Use a limited number of English words to express basic survival needs.
  • Recognize letters of the alphabet, numbers and simple words.
  • Copy letters of the alphabet, numbers and isolated words and phrases.

 

General ESL Study student learning outcomes
Beginning Low ESL

  • Recognize commonly used spoken words, phrases, simple learned expressions and questions in familiar contexts.
  • Employ simple learned phrases and sentences to engage in limited social situations using familiar basic conversations.
  • Identify limited information from simplified reading materials on familiar topics.
  • Write numbers, letters, high frequency words and simple sentences.
  • Use low beginning language structures and forms.

Beginning High ESL

  • Identify main ideas and key details in high beginning oral discourse in learned contexts.
  • Use high beginning vocabulary and structures to produce oral discourse.
  • Identify main ideas and key details in high beginning written discourse in learned contexts.
  • Use learned high beginning vocabulary and structures to produce simple written discourse.

Low Intermediate ESL

  • Identify main ideas and key details in low intermediate oral discourse in learned and new contexts.
  • Use low intermediate vocabulary and structures to produce oral discourse.
  • Identify main ideas and key details in low intermediate written discourse in learned and new contexts.
  • Use low intermediate vocabulary and structures to produce written discourse.

High Intermediate ESL

  • Determine major points and relevant supporting details in authentic spoken and literary and informational written texts.
  • Use intermediate high vocabulary, grammatical patterns, and register to communicate in extended oral and written discourse.
  • Produce well-organized written and oral presentations using intermediate high language skills.

Low Advanced ESL

  • Identify and analyze essential points of authentic listening texts on a wide variety of familiar and unfamiliar topics.
  • Communicate in extended conversations and discussions with appropriate syntax, word choice, grammatical structures, and register.
  • Interpret and analyze information in extended authentic informational and fictional written texts.
  • Write cohesive, well-developed multi-paragraph texts.
  • Use low advanced language structures and forms.

 

Vocational ESL student learning outcomes

Beginning VESL Skills

  • Evaluate and apply past life and work experience to job search.
  • Interpret and create written employment documents using beginning ESL.
  • Apply effective job interview skills at a beginning level.
  • Communicate in the workplace using beginning ESL language.
  • Identify and employ health and safety practices in the workplace.
  • Examine and describe U.S. workplace culture.
  • Recognize basic rights in the U.S. workplace.

Intermediate VESL Skills

  • Interpret general workplace culture and communication.
  • Communicate in the workplace and social settings using intermediate ESL structures and vocabulary.
  • Respond appropriately in spoken and written English to communicate with co-workers, supervisors and customers.
  • Compare aspects of U.S. workplace culture to home culture.
  • Evaluate the requirements and responsibilities of various careers.
  • Identify an awareness of cultural diversity in a work environment.
  • Create simple authentic workplace materials such as documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

 

Citizenship Preparation student learning outcomes
English language relating to effective citizenship. Relate personal information found in the Petition for Naturalization

  • Identify major facts in U.S. history.
  • Recall the structure and functions of the United States federal, state, and local governments.
  • Memorize basic facts and values reflected in the Constitution of the United States.
  • Relate basic personal information as found in the Petition for Naturalization.

 

Lisa Johnson
ESL Instructor

ESL Curriculum Resource Instructor

Academic Senate Noncredit Liaison

415.452.7148