Downtown Center

Assessment Progress Highlights | Assessment Process

Downtown Center

Current highlights are documented each semester in our Assessment Progress Reports and each year in our Program Review.

Pre-2014 highlights:

January 23, 2013

Downtown Center program coordinator meeting, Dr. Geisce Ly, Dean

Janaury 09, 2013

Faculty Flex Training (CATS) Classroom Assessment Techniques, Lecturer, Dr. Geisce Ly, Dowtown Center Dean

November 18, 2013

Business/Office Technology Program Review (Noncredit)

March 3, 2013

Business noncredit online student survey raw data (Chinatown, Downtown, John Adams, Mission, and Civic Center): 

February 15, 2013

Business/Office Technology SLO Planning Document (PDF)

December 3-12, 2012

Downtown Center online student survey raw data (N=413)

December 11, 2013

Downtown Center program coordinator meeting, Dr. Geisce Ly, Dean

November 13, 2013

Downtown Center program coordinator meeting, Dr. Geisce Ly, Dean

October 23, 2013

Downtown Center program coordinator meeting, Dr. Geisce Ly, Dean

July 22, 2013

Dean, Dr. Geisce Ly, Downtown Center Welcome Message: www.ccsf.edu/dtn/dean

November 13, 2012

Downtown Center Dean meets wtih campus coordinators for survey implementation.

October 29, 2012

Students gathered for a focus group session regarding the request of Accreditation Workgroup #5 for information on the delivery and prioritization of support services for students.

October 23, 2012

Students gathered for a focus group session regarding the request of Accreditation Workgroup #5 for information on the delivery and prioritization of support services for students.

October 15, 2012:

Develop multiple measures (pre/post survey, focus groups, etc) for assessing SLOs, David Doré, Dean

October 10, 2012:

Update their web pages per emailed instructions (assessment stages, narratives of process and progress, and national organization links)

August 31, 2012:

CCSF Center Deans to develop SLOs to be assessed, in addition to future action plans, David Doré, Dean

Spring 2011

Downtown Center online student survey raw data  (N=726)

Spring 2009

Downtown Center online student survey raw data (N=274)

Downtown Center Students

BUSINESS/OFFICE TECHNOLOGY NONCREDIT

Fall 2013 Noncredit Business Highlights

Major accomplishments and/or best practices include online noncredit registration (Web4), Instructional Program Assessment for Certificate of Competency Accounting Assitant Noncredit Certificate & Certificate of Completion of Computer Applicatons for Business Noncredit, Interactive Online Preregistration Form, Deployment of revised program certificate Ed Plans. Postcard and orientation documentation, increased contacts (MEDA, EDD, JVS), First Business/Office Technology Program Review,  new course outlines fitted within existing certificate program offerings, redesign of evaluation of preregistration processes to keep track on the progress of certificate program students. Business noncredit revised and streamlined seven noncredit program certificates 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013.

Process

Fall 2013 Instructional Program Assessment: Certificate of Competency (noncredit) Certificate of Competency Accounting Assistant Noncredit Certificate (Assessment Stage 4), Certificate of Completion Computer Applications for Business Noncredit Certificate, (Assessment Stage 4),

11/18/13: Business/Office Technology Program Review

03/03/13:  Business noncredit online student survey raw data (Chinatown, Downtown, John Adams, Mission, and Civic Center):

02/15/13: Downtown Center's Systems/SLO Planning Document (PDF)

Fall 201250 credit and noncredit course mappings before the Curriculum Committee.

Fall 2012:  Deploy Program Certificate Planning Guides

9/12/12:   Business credit and noncredit met to discuss SLO plans. The Department held its own evening session for those instructors who could not attend during the day.

Spring 2011 TrainGreen Cohort Student Survey

Spring 2009 Faculty Perkins Survey

LABOR MARKET DATA 2013-2014

Labor Market

Job Outlook

Receptionists & Information Clerks[1]

General Office Clerks

Customer Service

Bill & Account Collectors[2]

Bookkeeping, Accounting, & Auditing Clerks[3]

Financial Clerks

Secretaries & Administrative Assistants

Medical Secretaries[4]

24%

17%

15%

14%

14%

12%

11%

41%

Faster than Average

As Fast as Average / High Replacement

As Fast as Average

As Fast as Average / High Replacement

As Fast as Average / High Replacement

As Fast as Average / High Replacement

As Fast as Average

Faster than Average


[1] “Industry that employed the most receptionists in 2010 was Offices of physicians” (17%)

[2] “Largest industry is Business Support Services” (26%)

[3] “Must have basic math and computer skills, including knowledge of spreadsheets and bookkeeping software.”

[4] “Employment growth will be driven by rapid growth of the health care and social assistance industries.

Occupational Outllok Handbook 2013-2014 • U.S. Department of Labor

Downtown Center

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)

ESL

The ESL Noncredit Curriculum Committee has paraphrased the SLO's into language that ESL students can understand more easily, and it's designed for them at each level, from literacy through level 9.  On the NCCC website, https://sites.google.com/a/mail.ccsf.edu/nccc/, these paraphrased outlines have been posted as signs that can be printed out,  so that committee representitives can disseminate the outlines more easily across all campuses, and teachers can post them in classrooms and better facilitate students' understanding of what they are and how they relate to course content. 

At Downtown Campus, these small signs have been enlarged to permanent 36"x48' posters on photo-grade paper, thanks to Duplication Services, and 18 of them, two for each level 1-9, have been posted in classrooms so that an entire class can see the outcomes at one time.  We have many more classes than 18, so teachers are sharing the posters and printing out copies from the website.  Teachers have been briefed to facilitate students' understandingof the outcomes by explaining them in students' own words or through their own life stories.  This process, in turn, has led faculty to a fruitful discussion of ways to assess the outcomes and, finally, to refine assessments, teaching, and outcomes to better ensure success.

 

VISIT US AT THE ESL DEPARTMENT