Chapter 7: Course Applicability

Course Articulation, Graduation Requirements,and Transferability

Contents

  

7.1 Overview

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Once a credit, degree applicable course has been approved by the Curriculum Committee and the State Chancellor’s Office, it may be eligible to satisfy CCSF Graduation Requirements, and/or be accepted at a variety of articulation levels with four-year schools. The determination of a course’s applicability to any of these is partly within the purview of the Curriculum Committee. The guidance here is intended to shed some basic light on the processes involved, and to provide information to course outline developers who are hoping that their course will be accepted for graduation requirements or for articulation. Outline preparers and department chairs who hope to have the course satisfy one or more of these areas are encouraged to involve the Articulation Officer early in the process of developing a course outline.

  

7.2 CCSF Graduation Requirements

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There are several areas of general education requirements required for the CCSF Associate’s Degree. Courses apply to satisfy a particular General Education area by submitting a proposal through CurricUNET. In addition to meeting all CC criteria for degree-applicable courses, these courses also must:

  • Complete a mapping report demonstrating their course SLOs satisfy all relevant General Education Area SLOs

  • Demonstrate clearly in their course outline that their content, assignments, and evaluations reflect the General Education requirements for a particular area.

  • Be introductory in nature.

  • Be reviewed by multiple reviewers during Technical Review to assist with above

  • Be reviewed by the entire Curriculum Committee during a regular committee meeting.

  • Be updated at minimum every 6 years, per CC policy for all courses, and in that review demonstrate they continue to meet the general education area criteria and requirements.

Courses considered for inclusion in one of the General Education areas must be introductory in nature, which generally means they have no prerequisites. A prerequisite may be acceptable if it is a course that is often taken at the high school or pre-collegiate level. This would include courses in foreign language, English, ESL and math.

Below are brief summaries regarding General Education Requirements. These summaries provide guidance on the attributes that are required for each of the CCSF general education areas. These summaries include all Title 5 area requirements as well as CCSF-specific area requirements.

 

A: Communication and Analytical Thinking

Courses in language and rationality are those which develop for the student the principles and applications of language toward logical thought, clear and precise expression and critical evaluation of communication in whatever symbol system the student uses. Courses fulfilling the communication and analytical thinking requirement include oral communication, mathematics, logic, statistics, computer languages and programming, and related disciplines.

B: Written Composition

Courses fulfilling the written composition requirement should include both expository and argumentative writing.

C: Natural Sciences

Courses in the natural sciences are those which examine the physical universe, its life forms, and its natural phenomena. To satisfy the General Education requirement in natural sciences, a course should help the student develop an appreciation and understanding of the scientific method, and encourage an understanding of the relationships between science and other human activities. This category would include introductory or integrative courses in astronomy biology, chemistry, general physical science, geology, meteorology, oceanography, physics and other scientific disciplines.

D: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Courses in the social and behavioral sciences are those which focus on people as members of society. To satisfy the general education requirement in social and behavioral sciences, a course should help the student develop an awareness of the method of inquiry used by the social and behavioral sciences. It should stimulate critical thinking about the ways people act and have acted in response to their societies and should promote appreciation of how societies and social subgroups operate. This category would include introductory or integrative survey courses in anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, and related disciplines.

E: Humanities

Courses in the humanities are those which study the cultural activities and artistic expressions of human beings. To satisfy the general education requirement in the humanities, a course should help the student develop an awareness of the ways in which people throughout the ages and in different cultures have responded to themselves and the world around them in artistic and cultural creation and help the student develop aesthetic understanding and an ability to make value judgments. Such courses could include introductory or integrative courses in the arts, foreign languages, literature, philosophy, and religion. 

F: U.S. History and Government

Through its general education program, the College intends to graduate students who...have developed an appreciation and understanding of American history and government so that they can be responsible and active citizens.

G: Health Knowledge and Physical Skills

Through its general education program, the College intends to graduate students who...have developed an appreciation and understanding of the physical skills and health knowledge essential for mental and physical well-being.

H: Ethnic Studies, Women’s Studies, and Lesbian, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

Through its general education program, the College intends to graduate students who have demonstrated the ability to apply scholarship in the study of American Ethnic/Racial Minorities, Women, and Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals, and Transgenders have demonstrated ability in all the area GELOs as noted on the SLO website.

REVIEW PROCESS

General Education Student Learning Outcomes (GELOs) are designed for each general education area based on Title 5 criteria. So when a course maps its SLOs to these GELOs and its content, assignments, and evaluations reflect those GELOs, we are ensuring that a course meets GE Area applicability as long as the course is also “introductory” in nature.

Courses that are newly applying for general education area applicability will be identified as such by the Articulation Officer and automatically be designated for full committee review. They will be placed at the end of the agenda and given at least 15 minutes of time for discussion (more if needed, at the curriculum committee chair’s discretion). Course outlines of record will be accompanied by outcome mapping reports in committee materials, so that both can be considered by all members side by side. General Education content requirements will be reflected in GELOs and the consequent mapping, and review will accept courses for General Education area applicability only if the course adequately covers the GELO requirements in its own SLOs, content, assignments, and evaluation, and continues to be introductory in nature.

Courses that are being updated and that already meet general education area applicability will be considered by reviewers in the same process as described above, except that they will not require full committee review unless there has been significant alteration to the course or it fails to meet rigor or mapping requirements. General Education content requirements will still need to be reflected in GELOs and the consequent mapping and will retain its applicability only if the course continues to adequately cover the GELO requirements in its own SLOs, content, assignments, and evaluation and continues to be introductory in nature.  

7.3 CSU Transferability

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Almost all degree applicable courses at City College can be used for general or elective credit at CSU campuses. The CSU system has delegated the responsibility of identifying courses that are applicable for CSU elective credit to individual community colleges. As of Fall 2007, the only degree-applicable courses that do not qualify for CSU Elective Credit are:

  • Child Development 108A
  • English 96
  • Engineering Technology 108A
  • Math 835, 840, 850, 855, 860
  • Work Experience 805, 806, 807

  

7.4 University of California (UC) Transferability

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Only courses that have been reviewed and approved by the UC Office of the President may be used for general or elective credit at UC campus. The basic principles used by UC in determining the transferability of community college courses are:

  • Courses should be comparable to those offered at the lower division level at any of the UC campuses; and
  • Courses not equivalent to any offered at UC must be appropriate for a university degree in terms of purpose, scope, and depth.

Courses that are approved by the Curriculum Committee are automatically reviewed by the CSU/UC Breadth Committee at City College, which recommends courses to submit to the UC Office of the President for UC transferability. The CSU/UC Breadth Committee typically meets once a semester.

Departments are encouraged to discuss the option of UC transferability with the Articulation Officer.

  

7.5 CSU General Education Requirements

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The CSU General Education pattern allows students to complete their lower division general education requirements at the community college prior to transferring to a CSU campus. Courses that are approved by the Curriculum Committee are automatically reviewed by the CSU/UC Breadth Committee at City College, which recommends courses to submit to the CSU Chancellor’s Office for acceptance in one of the CSU GE areas.

CSU GE Area | Sub-Areas

A: Communication in the English Language and Critical Thinking

  • A1: Oral Communication
  • A2: Written Communication
  • A3: Critical Thinking

B: Physical Universe and its Life Forms

  • B1: Physical Science
  • B2: Life Science
  • B3: Laboratory Activity (taken with a course from B1 or B2)
  • B4: Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

C: Arts, Literature, Foreign Language, and Philosophy

  • C1: Arts
  • C2: Humanities

D: Social, Political, and Economic Institutions and Behavior, Historical Background

  • D0: Sociology and Criminology
  • D1: Anthropology and Archeology
  • D2: Economics
  • D3: Ethnic Studies
  • D4: Gender Studies
  • D5: Geography
  • D6: History
  • D7: Interdisciplinary Social or Behavioral Science
  • D8: Political Science, Government, and Legal Institutions
  • D9: Psychology

E: Lifelong understanding and self-development.

CSU has a statewide graduation requirement of United States History, Constitution and American Ideals (commonly known as American Institutions). Courses approved for this requirement may also be used to satisfy CSU GE requirements. The CSU/UC Breadth Committee at City College also reviews these courses for submission to the CSU Chancellor’s Office.

Departments are encouraged to discuss CSU GE and American Institutions acceptance with the Articulation Officer, and have the opportunity to provide input on which GE areas best match their courses.

  

7.6 IGETC

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IGETC (Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum) is the GE pattern students can follow to complete the lower division general education requirements for either the CSU or UC systems. Courses that are approved by the Curriculum Committee are automatically reviewed by the CSU/UC Breadth Committee at City College, which recommends courses to submit to the CSU and UC system offices for IGETC approval. Only UC transferable courses can be approved for IGETC. Table 28: IGETC Areas summarizes IGETC areas and any sub-areas.

IGETC Area | Sub-Areas:

1: English Communication

  • 1A: English Composition
  • 1B: Critical thinking – English Composition
  • 1C: Oral communication (CSU only)

2: Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning

3: Arts and Humanities

  • 3A: Arts
  • 3B: Humanities

4: Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • 4A: Anthropology
  • 4B: Economics
  • 4C: Ethnic Studies
  • 4D: Gender Studies
  • 4E: Geography
  • 4F: History
  • 4G: Interdisciplinary
  • 4H: Political Science
  • 4I: Psychology
  • 4J: Sociology

5: Physical and Biological Sciences

6: Language other than English (UC only)

Again, departments are encouraged to discuss IGETC acceptance with the Articulation Officer.

  

7.7 Course-to-Course Articulation

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The highest level of articulation is course-to-course articulation, where a course (or set of courses) at City College is considered the equivalent of a course at another institution, and generally counts towards lower division requirements of the major or discipline at that institution. The Articulation Officer, usually working with the department chair or advisors, will submit courses to the articulation officers of other institutions for course-to-course articulation consideration. The acceptance of a particular course is typically the determination of the respective department at the other institution. Departments at City College are encouraged to establish relationships with their counterparts at other campuses to help facilitate the review and acceptance of course-to- course articulation agreements.

  

7.8 Articulation Resources

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There are many articulation resources and programs that departments should be aware of. Contact the Articulation Officer if you would like more information about the following:

  • ASSIST – The official web-based clearinghouse for articulation between California community colleges, UCs and CSUs. Contains detailed information about how City College courses meet major requirements at individual CSU and UC campuses, and identifies those courses that have been approved for UC transferability, CSU GE, CSU United States History, Constitution and American Ideals, and IGETC.
    http://www.assist.org
  • CCSF Articulation Webpage – Contains links to public and private college articulation agreements with CCSF, university and college catalogs, general education handouts, and other resources.
    http://www.ccsf.edu/artic
  • C-ID (Course Identification Number System) – A newly funded project, sponsored by California Community Colleges (CCC) Chancellor’s Office, to develop a voluntary, “supra-numbering” system that links courses at CCCs, CSUs, UC, and possibly California private colleges. C-ID builds upon previous common course projects (CAN and LDTP). http://www.c-id.net