HIGHLIGHTS

Once a month, we highlight departments, programs, and committees from across the college that have great things happening motivated by a desire to improve student learning.

April 2015

Counseling--Student Athletics

Petrina Chi counseling athlete

Co-curricular and athletic programs are now required to meet ACCJC Standard II.C.4 concerning athletics. The standards require that athletics programs contribute to the social and cultural dimensions of the educational experience. At CCSF, our athletes are guided through the educational process by dedicated (in every sense of the word) athletics counselor Petrina Chi. Petrina’s assessment work assures that our student athletes know how to both navigate our educational pathways as well as NCAA regulations. Assessment work in athletics was highlighted by the Student Services Outcomes Assessment Team as a model to follow.

Chi concentrates much on her assessment work improving orientation sessions. Both pre/post tests and direct observations are used to improve outcomes. The pre/post survey includes 6 questions verifying a participant’s knowledge of broad areas student athletes must know as both an aspiring intercollegiate athlete, as well as a successful transfer student. Direct questions relate to Math and English placement importance, requirements to attain an Associate’s Degree, using the college's student information portal, WEB 4, as well as NCAA terminology, and the difference between the CCCAA (California's Community College Athletic Association) and the NCAA (National College Athletics Association). 

When pre-tests are given the need for the guidance of student services is evident.  For example, 40% did not know the difference between a Greyshirt and Redshirt. Only 30% knew what courses they needed to take to attain an Associate’s Degree. Only 32% knew how to log onto their Web 4 account. 49% thought that the general education for an Associate’s Degree was the same requirements as transferring to a four year institution. Finally, 46% did not know the difference between the CCCAA and NCAA. 

The post-test (after orientation) show positive results: 100% understood the important of the English and Math placement test. Only 8% did not know the difference between a Greyshirt and Redshirt. 96% knew what courses they needed to take to attain an Associate’s Degree. 84% knew how to log onto their Web 4 account. 51% still thought that the general education for an Associate’s Degree was the same requirements as transferring to a four year institution. Only 8% still did not know the difference between the CCCAA and NCAA.

Overall, the results indicate orientation attendees received the necessary information the orientation was attempting to convey. However, the question and answer portion of each survey proved that although general knowledge was achieved, the students desired further detail and had many follow-up inquires afterwards.  Based on this information and direct observation as well as dialogue with Athletics’ Directors, it was decided that offering an actual credit course which orientates a student athlete to intercollegiate level teams, competition, academic and athletic eligibility and requirements, as well as an array of other related issues and topics such as social media awareness, athletic training etiquette, sportsmanship, health and nutrition to name a few would benefit student athletes at the college and assure we meet the new standards.

Transfer Center

book filled corner in Transfer center

The Transfer Center has been closing the loop by continually assessing and making improvements! In the last cycle, we looked at previous data and modified our presentation to include more information in the areas where we saw the least amount of improvement, which also coincided with some of the most important aspects of transfer. Namely, we spent more time talking about the steps to transfer to a college and university, and on how to find the classes needed to take for the transfer major through www.assist.org. Also, introducing FAQs intermittently during the presentation helped to keep the students engaged. The addition of a new slide to convey the 70 maximum transferable units seemed to promote a greater understanding of this concept due to the visual nature of the slide.

The Transfer Center has also been collaborating with instructional program to assess its outcomes. To collect data on the effectiveness of the Transferring to a University Workshop, the Transfer Center assessed students in the Engineering 10A course (Intro. to Engineering: The Profession). We used a Pre and Post online survey that was made available by the instructor to all students registered in this class. The survey included 6 items that ranged from general transfer knowledge to more specific transfer preparation awareness. The student was asked to select one of three statements to self-assess their knowledge of each of the 6 items related to transfer information.

Of the 6 items in the survey, the two statements we identified as the most important indicators of success for this student learning outcome about transferring to a university was: 1. I know the minimum requirements to transfer to a CSU and/or UC; and 2. I know how to find the classes I need to take for my major to transfer.

Pre-Test Survey: From the 68 students, 34% indicated that they were at the Proficient Level when asked about knowing the minimum requirements to transfer to a CSU and/or UC. For the statement asking whether the student knew how to find the classes needed to take for a specific major to transfer, 53% indicated that they were at the Proficient Level.

Post-Test Survey: From the 68 students, an increase to 80% was indicated at the Proficient Level when asked about knowing the minimum requirements to transfer to a CSU and/or UC. For the statement asking whether the student knew how to find the classes needed to take for a specific major to transfer, an increase to 84% was indicated at the Proficient Level.

The change in these students understanding of the minimum university transfer requirements after the workshop yielded an increase of 56% more students at the proficient level. The change in these students knowing where to find the classes that need to be taken for a specific major to transfer yielded an increase of 31% more students at the proficient level.

Summary: Our benchmark goal is to have 80% of the students meet the Proficient Level for all six items listed in the survey with particular attention paid to the following two items: 1. I know the minimum requirements to transfer to a CSU and/or UC; and 2. I know how to find the classes I need to take for my major to transfer as the primary indicators of meeting our student learning outcome. After the workshop concluded, results indicate that we have met our goal with these two specific items. In addition, regarding the remaining four items on the survey, results range from 72% - 79% which is at the Developing Level, and therefore very close to the Proficient Level.