Back to NC Curriculum Guide Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Level 8 Literacy A Literacy B

Intermediate-High 8
Legend:
Italics
taken directly from the Model Standards
{item or items}
specific vocabulary to be taught
N
objective to be introduced
C
objective to be continued
R
objective to be reviewed
(receptive only)
teacher uses structure/vocabulary without grammatical explanation and does not expect students to produce

Student Profile at Entry

Students enter the Intermediate High level with enough ability in the use of English to function independently in most familiar situations.

Approach

Emphasis is on fluency and communication. The instructor teaches students the skills of self-monitoring in the context of situations which require the use of English for communication. Expansion of previously taught matter is emphasized, with particular stress on the students' ability to create from their own oral and written ideas using basic forms already learned. In order to develop ease in their second language, students should be given opportunities to speak and listen to people from this and other countries as much as possible. In addition to information-gap exercises and oral presentations, the students should be given contact exercises and encouraged to view films and TV programs outside of class. At this level, students should be encouraged to do unguided writing by keeping journals, establishing pen-pals, publishing their own writings in student newspapers, and by writing their own resumes. When possible, students should be given opportunities to use computers for general language learning or to develop writing skills.

Reading will also be more varied at this level and should include articles from newspapers and magazines. In addition, students continue to use the critical thinking skills introduced at the previous level. They begin to use strategies to synthesize and interpret information and to evaluate evidence, arguments, interpretations, beliefs, or theories.

Pair and group work should continue to be encouraged. These strategies will aid the students in developing tolerances for inaccuracies and pronunciation difficulties of both other non-native speakers and themselves. A classroom atmosphere should be created which fosters an understanding and acceptance of human differences and beliefs.

Course Content

Topics

Course content is relevant to the lives of the students. It integrates language functions and language forms with informational sources, skills, and topics. Topics are chosen in accordance with students' goals: general and vocational. Informational sources, skills, and topics at this level include:

Information Sources

Skills
General Topics
Vocational Topics
Newspapers
Note taking
Post Office forms
Social Security
Encyclopedias
Outlining
Health information
Preparedness for job interviews
Tests
Map reading
Medical history
Benefits
Maps
Scanning
Doctor visits
Wages & deductions
Table of Contents
Skimming
Community resources



Tenant's rights



Leisure activities



Current events



Stories/fables



Major historical events



Multi-cultural awareness

Additional topics and vocabulary based on student needs should be added.

Culture

Students have participated in enough culture-oriented tasks in the classroom to act appropriately when faced with situations involving cultural differences. Topics such as taboos and politics are taught explicitly by focusing on contrasts among the students' own cultures.

Language Functions

On exit, students will be able to use language for:

*

Factual Information: compare and contrast, express possibility and probability, offer to do something.
*
Social and interpersonal relations: Express sympathy, hope and regret
*
Suasion: recommend, solve problems, instruct language skills

Listening: On exit students will be able to:

C

Identify main ideas and most supporting detail in factual material relating to everyday topics.
N
Detect the mood of a passage, determining to a limited degree such components as the attitudes and feelings of the speakers or the urgency of the message.
C
Demonstrate understanding of stories and other familiar contexts.
C
Demonstrate understanding of everyday conversation with some repetition of slower speech.
C
Demonstrate understanding of English spoken at a normal rate in restricted subject areas such as topics covered in class, in student activities, or in short narratives.
C
Recognize changes in syllabic stress that change meaning: próduce, prodúce.
C
Demonstrate ability to listen without understanding every word of extended conversation.
C
Demonstrate understanding of implicit information such as feelings, consequence.
R
Demonstrate comprehension without reliance on translation.
R
Demonstrate understanding of reduced forms.

Speaking: On exit, students will be able to:

C

Participate in face-to-face conversation on some topics beyond immediate survival needs, such as people and places.
N
Display some spontaneity and creativity in producing language patterns not previously learned or memorized; however, errors will be common.
C
Adjust language forms to level of formality required to fulfill basic courtesy functions required in face-to-face conversations.
C
Clarify utterances by rewording or repeating in order to be understood by the general public.
C
Communicate on the telephone on familiar subjects with clarification
R
Use projection, pitch, intonation, stress and elision.
R
Use appropriate register in conversation.
R
Use common interruption words and turn-taking in conversations.
R
Repeat or rephrase questions, requests, statements to clarify or confirm and gain time.
N
Demonstrate an ability to pass on information obtained aurally.
C
Participate in group discussions.
N
Demonstrate an ability to talk about a subject for 2-3 minutes.
C
Participate in "small talk."
R
Discuss employment history.
N
Discuss educational history.

Reading: On exit students will be able to:

C

Interpret simple authentic materials on familiar topics (newspaper articles on current events, social letters, public information notices).
C
Identify the main idea of a paragraph on a familiar topic.
C
Guess the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary and phrases from context.
N
Find information that requires drawing from different sections of a reading passage.
C
Draw meaning from passages by using syntactic clues, such as pronoun references.
C
Identify relationships within a passage by using syntactic clues, such as transitional words: therefore, for example.
R
Demonstrate understanding of graphic format of business letters.
R
Use indices, glossaries, appendices in reading material.
R
Demonstrate ability to distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.
R
Demonstrate understanding of implicit and explicit information.
N
Skim and scan increasingly difficult reading passages.
N
Use reference materials and library conventions.
C
Increase speed in silent reading.
R
Read for enjoyment.

Writing: On exit students will be able to:

C

Write short paragraphs describing daily activities or past events, using chronological order.
R
Write personal letters.
N
Fill out authentic job applications and medical forms.
R
Revise content of writing.
R
Edit for style and meaning.
R
Proofread for errors.
R
Write under a time limit.
N
Write a resume.
R
Write a business letter.
N
Write structures and vocabulary for this level with proper spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

Language Forms

On exit, students will be able to use the following structures:

Sentence Types

C

Adjectival clauses: The person who made the announcement was the manager. The book which is on top is mine.
C
*Complex sentences
N
*Relative clauses with {who, which, that}, including deletion of the relative pronoun: This is the book that I bought. This is the book I bought.
C
*Embedded questions: Do you know what time it is?
C
*Noun clauses, statements and questions, with {who, what, how, where, when}
C
Indirect speech: He said he was going.

Verbs

C

Past perfect: He had worked there for ten years when he got a promotion.
N
Past perfect continuous
C
Passive simple present: The mail is delivered every afternoon.
N
Passive simple past: The report was written last year.
C
{say} vs. {tell}: He said he was hungry. He told me he was hungry .
C
Conditional contrary-to-fact: If I were rich, I would buy a house.
N
Inseparable verbs of more than two words: She came down with a nasty cold. He put up with her bad manners.

Nouns

C

Appositives.
C
Pronominalization of possessive proper nouns.
C
Comparison of nouns.

Pronouns

R

Review as needed.

Adjectives

C

Comparative expressions: {as...as, similar to, the same as, different from}
R
Superlatives: regular and irregular.
C
Present and past participles as adjectives: It's a used car. He's a swimming teacher.
C
Present vs. past participle meanings: He's a boring student. He's a bored student.
N
Adjective phrases, including word order: The woman in the corner is my sister.

Adverbs and Adverbials

C

{any more, still}
C
Adverbials with {by} + reflexive pronoun.
C
Superlative adverbs.

Prepositions

N

{in spite of, besides}, and other prepositions used with the structures taught at this level.

Conjunctions

C

{until}
C
{not only ... but also}

Evaluation

Please see web pages under Assessment.