Back to NC Curriculum Guide Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Level 8 Literacy A Literacy B

Beginning-High 3
Legend:
Italics
taken directly from the Model Standards
{item or items}
specific vocabulary to be taught
N
objective to be introduced
C
objective to be continued
R
objective to be reviewed
(receptive only)
teacher uses structure/vocabulary without grammatical explanation and does not expect students to produce

Student Profile at Entry

Students enter the Beginning High level with limited ability to read and write in English; they function in the use of English in a very limited way, speaking in English in situations related to their immediate needs.

Approach

At this level, Fluency and communication begin to be emphasized. The instructor begins to assist students in correcting their errors.

In Beginning High, although the major emphasis remains on oral and aural skills, more attention is given to reading and writing. There should be a transition from using reading and writing for reinforcement of oral/aural skills to reading and writing as independent skills.

Tapes are useful for exposing the students to and fostering a tolerance for a variety of non-standard English. Pair and group work should be encouraged. Methods such as cooperative learning will aid the students in developing tolerance for inaccuracies and pronunciation difficulties of both other non-native speakers and themselves. Activities such as task based assignments and roleplaying naturally address the overlap between listening and speaking.

As students receive feedback on written work from their teachers, they develop a sense of responsibility for and competence in the learned material. Whenever possible, students will be given opportunities to use computers for general language learning or to develop writing skills.

Vocabulary should be taught through context and reflect not only the students' survival needs, but their need to express themselves as adults. Students are refining and further practicing the critical-thinking skills learned in Beginning Low. At this level, they learn to use strategies that help them to detect bias, determine the factual accuracy of a statement, make plausible inferences, and reason.

Classroom atmosphere should foster acceptance of human differences and beliefs.

Course Content

Topics

Course content is relevant to the lives of the students. It integrates language functions and language forms with informational sources, skills, and topics. Topics are chosen in accordance with students' goals: general or vocational. Informational sources, skills, and topics at this level include:

Information Sources

Skills
General Topics
Vocational Topics
Telephone directory
Alphabetizing
Housing
Job skills
Simple maps
Test-taking
Transportation
Classified ads
Test forms
Categorizing
Emergencies
Job safety
Signs
Scanning
General Health

Ads

Shopping

Personal Forms

Banking



Recreation



Postal Services



Holidays & celebrations



Multi-cultural awareness

Additional topics and vocabulary based on student needs should be added.

Culture

Social customs (standing in line or expressing politeness in handling everyday situations, for example) are taught explicitly through modeling positive and negative examples and through controlled practice, such as role-playing.

Language Functions:

On exit, students will be able to use English for:


*

Factual information: ask for information, describe, express necessity, ask permission, agree, disagree

*
Social and interpersonal relations, compliment, preference, express wants/desires

*
Suasion: direct, invite

Language Skills

Listening: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Demonstrate understanding of simple words and phrases drawn from learned topics.
N
Demonstrate understanding of non face-to-face speech in familiar contexts, such as simple phone conversations and routine announcements.
N
Recognize words that signal differences between present, past, and future events.
R
Respond appropriately to short emergency warnings: Stop!; Get back!; Slow down!
N
Follow multiple-step instructions and directions to specific destinations face to face
N
Recognize reduced forms such as [gonna].
N
Demonstrate comprehension of general meaning without understanding every word.
N
Demonstrate understanding of explicit information through appropriate responses.
N
Demonstrate comprehension without reliance on translation.
N
Demonstrate an ability to listen in spite of interference.

Speaking: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Answer simple questions related to basic needs using previously learned phrases or simple sentences.
N
Make statements in the past, present, and future tenses related to basic needs and common activities using previously learned phrases or simple sentences.
N
Ask questions related to basic needs using previously learned utterances.
N
Communicate simple personal information on the telephone.
N
Respond verbally when spoken to.
N
Use projection, pitch, intonation, and stress.
R
Use elision: I opened it. [I open dit.]
N
Use appropriate register (formal/informal) in conversation.
N
Use common interruption and turn-taking expressions in conversations, such as [Excuse me; May I say something?]
N
Repeat or rephrase questions, requests, and statements to clarify or confirm.
N
Use English to communicate effectively with teacher and classmates.

Reading: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Interpret isolated words and phrases in familiar contexts (traffic signs, store ads, fast food menus).
N
Interpret terms on simplified forms (personal identification, school registration, checks, change of address).
N
Scan for numerical information (the time a store opens, for example) and other specific information in simple life-skill materials related to immediate needs (ads, schedules, signs, forms).
N
Use strategies such as predicting or phonics decoding to interpret new words in familiar contexts.
N
Read and demonstrate understanding of short, simplified narrative paragraphs on familiar topics containing previously learned vocabulary and sentence patterns.
N
Find words in alphabetical sequence.
N
Recognize graphic format of titles and paragraphs.
N
Recognize common prefixes and suffixes.
R
Recognize graphic format of personal letters.

Writing: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Copy materials that are meaningful to the students (recipes, directions, stories generated during language-experience activities).
N
Write lists (grocery or laundry items, for example).
N
Write simple sentences based on personal experiences or familiar material.
N
Write words in alphabetical sequence.
N
Write the structures and vocabulary taught at this level with proper spelling, punctuation and capitalization.
N
Fill out simple forms such as money orders and change of address.
N
Make corrections based on teacher's correction marks.
R
Use lined paper correctly.

Language Forms

On exit, students will be able to use the following structures:

Sentence Types

R

Simple statements, simple questions, long & short answers, questions with {or}, and Wh-questions with structures taught at this level
R
Compound sentences with {and} and {but}.
N
Compound sentences with {and ... too}, {and ... either},and {or}:
*I like this and Maria does, too.
*I don't speak Chinese, and Maria doesn't either.
*Do you want to study English, or do you want to study math?

R
Questions with {whose}; {how much} with noncount noun, {how many} with count noun.

Verbs

R

Future: {going to}
N
Future: {will} I will call you tonight.
R
Simple present
N
*with general truths: Water boils at 212deg.F.
R
Simple past
N
*with more irregular verbs
R
Present continuous: He is studying now.
N
Verbs followed by infinitives: He wants to dance.
N
Subject-verb agreement with noncountable nouns (furniture, housing, transportation)
R
Modal: can
N
Modals:
*{have to, could (as past of can), should, must, may, and would
*I have to study.
*I could not come to school yesterday.
*You should see the doctor..
*I must get a driver's license..
*You may stay up late.
*Would you open the window?

N
Two-word verbs
N
*Separable/inseparable with noun object: Put your jacket on. Put on your jacket.

Nouns

R

Common irregular plurals
R
Possessive nouns
N
Countable/noncountable with corresponding subject/verb agreement
N
Nouns as adjectives: bus stop

Pronouns

N

Nominalization of possessive pronouns: Her pen is blue. Mine is red.
R
indefinite as subject and object: {one, some, any, everyone, someone, anyone, no one}
R
indefinite as subject and object: {none, everybody, somebody, anybody, nobody, everything, something, anything, nothing}
R
{It} as subject with weather and time: It is Tuesday.

Adjectives

R

Articles: {a, an, the}
R
quantifiers
N
{both}
N
Comparative: regular and common irregular
N
Multiple adjective word order before a noun

Adverbs and Adverbials

R

Frequency: {often, usually, sometimes, always, never}
N
Frequency: {once a day, twice a week, 3 times a year, several times, many times}
N
Manner, including some irregulars: He drives fast. She speaks slowly.
N
{too, enough}, and intensifiers with {not}
R
Means: {by bus, by car, by plane, on foot}

Prepositions

R

{before, after, from, by, with, behind, in front of}
N
{into, through, over, underneath, beside, across, around}

Conjunctions

R

Connecting words and short phrases: {and, or}
R
{and} and {but} in compound sentences

Evaluation

Please see web pages under Assessment.