City College of San Francisco Multicultural Infusion Project  
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What's New

Spring 2014

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Candace Thille

 

  • Culture Shift: Innovation, Engagement, Achievement • February 6th, 2014
  • Leveling the Playing Field: Understanding the need to support students with learning disabilities

Neurodiversity. We hear more and more about this topic in the media, books, shows. But what does it look like in practice? Why is it “fair” for some students to have more time to complete tests, or to have notetakers in class? How can we protect students from humiliation and make it easier for them to approach us for accommodations? 

Facilitated by Mary Bravewoman, Dora Rodriguez and Tracy Burt

  • Mapping Assessments to Course SLO's

Mapping Assessments to Course SLOs: In this hands-on workshop you will map your current assessments to SLOs in one of your courses. From there we will discuss strategies for documenting assessment of SLOs once every three years. Resources for mapping and rubrics for documentation/easy data collection will be provided. Time permitting, we will dialogue about making connections between SLO documentation and student achievement data. 

Tracy Burt, CDEV Faculty, MIP Coordinator

 

Fall 2013

Workshop Description: Join other CCSF colleagues working to center the success of underrepresented students to design and imagine new ways to support innovation at CCSF. ISKME will introduce us to their Action Collab process which uses the design-thinking framework to innovate new ideas with actionable next steps. Design thinking is a creative process to design meaningful solutions.

Follow this link to learn more about action collabs: http://www.iskme.org/services/action-collabs

  • Bridges to Success Report • June 20, 2013

In April 2009, City College’s Board of Trustees passed a Student Achievement Gap and Social Equity Resolution.1 The report revealed that at City College, students who identify as African American, Native American, Filipino, Latino, Pacific Islander and Southeast Asian are 10-20% more likely to say their educational goal is completing a 2 or 4 year degree than their Asian and White counterparts. Yet these same groups transfer at rates that are 19-21% lower, even six years after they begin their career at City College. While progress has been made through the Bridge to Success initiative to improve access for these groups, a more concerted effort needs to be made around retention. more.....

Spring 2013

  • Bridge to Success Reports:

CCSF Retention Focus Groups: Summary May 29, 2012 (link to doc)

Summary of student focus group results intended to help inform a planning process to improve student retention and completion on campus. This brief summaries key themes and highlights student comments from the focus groups.

CCSF Institutional Challenges to Student Completion:Faculty, Staff and Administrator Interview Summary: June 20, 2012 (Link to Doc)

 

Report on staff and faculty insights into the challenges to student retention and completion at CCSF.

  • National Resources to Improve Equity at Community Colleges:

Community College Resource Center: http://ccrc.tc.columbia.edu/

CCRC is the leading independent authority on two-year colleges in the United States. They conduct research on the issues affecting community colleges and work with colleges and states to improve student success and institutional performance.

This practitioner packet summarizes research on nonacademic student supports and makes recommendations on how to design student supports to maximize their impact on student achievement.

Student Success Scorecard: http://scorecard.cccco.edu/scorecard.aspx

The California Community Colleges Board of Governors has established a performance measurement system that tracks student success at all 112 community colleges.


Student Success Scorecard: Disaggregated Data

Completion Rate* for Cohort Tracked for Six Years Through 2011-12


State

CCSF

Overall

49.2%

55.6%

African-American

39.0%

37.6%

American Indian/Alaskan Native

38.5%

23.8%

Asian

66.7%

71.7%

Filipino

50.6%

34.6%

Hispanic

39.5%

39.1%

Pacific Islander

40.9%

38.6%

White

53.5%

50.8%

  • Additional National Resources:

American Association of Colleges and Universities: www.aacu.org

AAC&U is the leading national association committed to advancing and improving liberal education for all students.

AAC&U High Impact Practices: http://www.aacu.org/leap/hip.cfm

Teaching and learning practices that have been widely tested and have been shown to impact success of underrepresented students. These practices take many different forms, depending on learner characteristics and on institutional priorities and contexts.


AAC&U Value Rubrics: http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/pdf/All_Rubrics.pdf

T he VA L UE rubrics were developed by teams of faculty experts representing colleges and universities across the United States through a process that examined many existing campus rubrics and related documents for each learning outcome and incorporated additional feedback from faculty.

  • California Resources to Improve Equity at Community Colleges:

LearningWorks www.learningworks.org

Learningworks aims to strengthen student achievement in the California Community Colleges by facilitating, disseminating and funding practitioner-informed recommendations for changes at the system and classroom levels, infusing these strategies with statewide and national insights.


California Acceleration Project: http://cap.3csn.org/

The California Acceleration Project supports the state’s 112 community colleges to redesign their developmental English and Math curricula and increase student completion


Webinar: “College Completion: Why Accelerating Developmental English and Math is the Essential First Step”

  • Equity Work at CCSF

In April 2009, City College’s Board of Trustees passed a Student Achievement Gap and Social EquityResolution.1 The report revealed that at City College, students who identify as African American, NativeAmerican, Filipino, Latino, Pacific Islander and Southeast Asian are 10-20% more likely to say their educational goal is completing a 2 or 4 year degree than their Asian and White counterparts. Yet these same groups transfer at rates that are 19-21% lower, even six years after they begin their career at City College.

Preliminary Report on the Student Achievement Gap and Social Equity Resolutions October 16, 2009

  • High Impact Practices Workshop Series • April 9, 2013

Spotlight on High Impact Practices

Undergraduate Research, Service Learning/Internships, and Diversity & Global Learning

Join us to delve more deeply into these three High Impact Practices. We will share examples from across the country, explore why these practices have a profound impact on the engagement and success of underrepresented students and identify how they can help us "Close the Loop" and continue to up our game. 

with Jeff Chang

"Culture moves before politics," says Jeff Chang. In the seminal Can't Stop Won't Stop, Chang used hip-hop culture to radically remix the last 25 years of America's political and social history. In his pulsating follow-up, Who We Be, he traces the rise of multiculturalism—its roots, its triumphs, its commercialization —to tell a new, vibrant, and utterly necessary people's history.

  • High Impact Practices Workshop Series • March 5, 2013

High Impact Practices

Join us to learn about High Impact Practices (HIPs) that have been shown to raise the level of student learning for all students - with underrepresented students demonstrating the most notable gains.  The HIPs positively impact both SLOs and student achievement.  The first part of the workshop will review and explore HIPs like Capstone Projects, Undergraduate Research and Internships and the second part of the workshop will involve practical steps for implementing them your work with students. Media: Download Powerpoint Presentation 

A conversation with Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D.

Microaggressions usually involve demeaning implications and other subtle insults. They include microassaults, microinsults and microinvalidations. They are the constant and continuing everyday reality of slights, insults, invalidations, and indignities visited upon marginalized groups.