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Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Level 8 Literacy A Literacy B

Intermediate-Low 5
Legend:
Italics
taken directly from the Model Standards
{item or items}
specific vocabulary to be taught
N
objective to be introduced
C
objective to be continued
R
objective to be reviewed
(receptive only)
teacher uses structure/vocabulary without grammatical explanation and does not expect students to produce

Student Profile at Entry

Students entering this level function satisfactorily in the use of English in basic survival situations related to their needs.

Approach

Emphasis is on fluency and communication; however, the instructor begins to encourage students to check themselves when they use basic grammatical structures. More emphasis is placed on a balance between practice of listening/speaking skills and reading/writing skills. Students develop critical thinking, problem solving and decision making skills. In addition, Intermediate Low students use strategies that help them to detect bias, determine the factual accuracy of a statement, and make plausible inferences.

The methods of instruction at Intermediate Low follow those of Beginning High, such as the use of dialogs, role playing, information gap exercises, pronunciation work, spelling exercises and games. Extensive reading and context-based vocabulary development is done. Both guided and unguided writing are implemented at this level. When possible, students should be given an opportunity to use computers for general language learning or to develop writing skills. Extensive pair and group work should be encouraged. Group methods such as cooperative learning maximize opportunities for student participation, facilitate risk-taking and help students to develop tolerances for inaccuracies and pronunciation difficulties of both other non-native speakers and themselves. Also, a classroom atmosphere should be created which fosters an understanding and acceptance of human differences and beliefs.

Course Content

Topics

Course content is relevant to the lives of the students. It integrates language functions and language forms with informational sources, skills and topics. Topics are chosen in accordance with students' goals: general, vocational, academic. Informational sources, skills and topics at this level include:

Information Sources

Skills
General Topics
Vocational Topics
Dictionary
Alphabetizing
Medicine labels
Pay checks
Telephone directories
Test-taking
Food recipes
Job applications
Newspapers
Scanning
Shopping
Job search strategies
Tests
Skimming
Banking
Work schedules
Maps
Map reading
Holidays & celebrations

Want Ads

Nutrition



Recreation



Autobiographies



Famous people



Multi-cultural awareness

Additional topics and vocabulary based on student needs should be added.

Culture

Rules of etiquette common in routine social situations in U.S. culture outside the classroom environment are taught explicitly by focusing on ways the rules contrast with customs in each students' own culture and the cultures of other students in the class. Appropriate content at this level might be forms of address based on social status. Humor might be introduced at this level.

Language Functions

On exit, students will be able to use English for:


*

Factual information: express obligation, explain, indicate certainty, express ability or inability

*
Social and interpersonal relations: apologize, make excuses, express worry and disappointment, give and get permission, make offers

*
Suasion: suggest, advise

Language Skills

Listening: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Demonstrate understanding of simple questions and answers, statements, and face-to-face conversations in standard dialects containing some unfamiliar vocabulary.
N
Recognize basic constructions such as subject-verb agreement ("He work." versus "He works.").
N
Demonstrate understanding of telephone conversations on familiar material in familiar contexts.
R
Follow instructions for multiple-step procedures and directions to specific destinations in face to face exchanges.
R
Follow instructions for multiple-step procedures and directions to specific destinations by telephone.
R
Recognize reduced forms: [gonna ].
R
Recognize that meaning is affected by sentence level stress, and intonation.
R
Demonstrate comprehension of general meaning without understanding every word.
N
Demonstrate understanding of implicit information: place, time, relationship of speakers .
R
Demonstrate comprehension without reliance on translation.
R
Demonstrate an ability to listen in spite of interference.

Speaking: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Participate in simple face-to-face conversations dealing with basic survival needs and minimum courtesy requirements (thanking, meeting, apologizing).
N
Ask and answer questions in simple present, past, and future tenses on familiar topics.
N
Participate in simple telephone conversations.
N
Describe a sequence of events in the past on a topic related to their personal lives.
R
Respond verbally when spoken to.
R
Use projection, pitch, intonation, stress and elision: I opened it. [I open dit.]
R
Give unsolicited information or messages.
R
Use appropriate register (formal/informal) in conversation.
R
Use common interruption words, such as Excuse me, and turn-taking in conversations.
R
Repeat or rephrase questions, requests and statements to clarify or confirm.
N
Discuss employment history.

Reading: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Interpret simplified short narrative and descriptive passages on familiar topics.
N
Interpret simple narrative and descriptive passages on unfamiliar topics if material includes visuals or other aids that orient students to the passages.
N
Scan for specific information in simple life-skill materials (ads, schedules, signs, forms) related to immediate needs.
N
Predict meanings of unfamiliar vocabulary in material rich in contextual clues.
N
Interpret newspaper headlines on familiar topics.
N
Interpret abbreviations for words previously learned in context of specific topics-employment and housing, for example.
N
Recognize graphic format of paragraphs and conversations.
R
Recognize graphic format of personal letters.
R
Recognize table of contents and major divisions in reading material.
R
Demonstrate understanding of implicit information.
N
Recognize prefixes, roots, suffixes.
N
Recognize common transitional words.
N
Demonstrate comprehension of general meaning of text without understanding every word.
N
Read for enjoyment.
N
Recognize major divisions and subdivisions of reading material
N
Demonstrate ability to distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.

Writing: On exit, students will be able to:

N

Write related sentences to form paragraphs on a topic.
N
Write telephone messages.
N
Write short thank-you notes.
N
Complete simple forms (job application, banking).
N
Write structure and vocabulary taught at this level with proper spelling, punctuation and capitalization.
N
Write personal letters.
R
Write under a time limit.
N
Revise content of writing.
N
Edit for style and meaning.
N
Proofread for errors.

Language Forms

On exit, students will be able to use the following structures:

Sentence Types

R

Questions with {which, how, what kind of}
R
Questions with {will you, shall I/we, would you, could you}
R
Compound sentences with {and ... too}, {and ... either}, and {or}
N
Compound sentences with {so}: It's raining, so we are staying home.
N
Adverbial clauses of time: {when, before, after} I'll call you when he comes.
N
Adverbial clauses of reason: {because} I was absent because my child was sick.
N
Exclamatory sentences: What a beautiful day!

Verbs

R

Future: will
N
Future conditional: If I get a job, I'll take night classes.
N
`Going to' future with simple present for use in complex sentences: When I finish this course, I'm going to look for a job.
N
Present continuous as future with verbs of travel: leave, sail, fly, depart, arrive, go, travel: I'm flying to Hong Kong next week.
R
Simple past
N
Past continuous: I was taking a shower when he called.
N
Present perfect: I have lived in the U.S. for two years.
N
Present perfect continuous: I have been studying English since last year.
N
{used to}: I used to live in Mexico.
R
Modals: {should, could, may, would, must (necessity)}
N
Modals: {might/must (deduction)} It might rain. You must be tired.
R
Modals: {have to}
N
Modal combinations: {had to, had better, ought to, would like to}
R
Two-word verbs
N
*More two-word verbs; separable/inseparable
R
Verbs followed by infinitives
N
Verbs followed by gerunds: He enjoys dancing. He likes swimming.
N
Linking verbs

Nouns

R

Singular and plural nouns: Count/noncount
N
Nouns that are always plural: groceries, glasses, pliers
N
Nouns that are always singular: news, politics, the United States
R
Nouns as adjectives
N
Gerunds as subjects and objects: Swimming is good exercise. He's afraid of flying.

Pronouns

N

indefinite {it} as subject: It is important to go.
N
{ones}: Mary has three new books. John has three old ones.
R
Direct/indirect object word order
R
Reflexive pronouns
R
{anyone, anybody, no one, nobody, nothing}

Adjectives

N

{other, another, the other, neither, either}
N
No article for generalization with plural count and noncount nouns: Vegetables are healthy. Milk is good for you.
N
{a/an} with singular count nouns for generalization: A butterfly is an insect.
N
{the} for specified nouns: The man in the corner is Mr. Smith.
R
Comparative: regular and common irregular
R
Multiple adjective word order

Adverbs and Adverbials

N

Negative frequency adverbs and word order, mid-sentence adverbs with {be} and with other verbs: {not ever, ever, hardly ever}
R
{too, enough}
N
{too} and {enough} with infinitives: That table is too heavy to lift.
N
Contrast {too} with {very} and {so}: John is too tired. John is very tired.
N
Adverb phrases: since 10:00, for two hours
R
Chronological order: afterwards, later, next, then, finally

Prepositions

N

Review and introduce as appropriate

Conjunctions

R

Or in compound sentences
R
Correlative conjunctions either ... or, both ... and
N
because

Evaluation

Please see web pages under Assessment.