Using Hyperterminal

General Introduction

This document explains how to use an IBM PC or compatible running Windows 95, a Hayes-compatible modem, and Hyperterminal to connect to the campus data network. This document also provides information on transferring files between your PC and your Unix account using Hyperterminal. There is a version of Hyperterminal included with Windows 95 but there is a more recent version available which fixes a few problems and adds some useful features. The majority of the information in this document applies to both the Hyperterminal 1.0 and Private Edition 2.0.

Installing Hyperterminal

From the Windows 95 original disks.

On most Windows 95 machines, Hyperterminal should be installed without explicitly requesting it. If you need to install a copy of the standard Hyperterminal program, go to the Start menu, choose the Settings option, and click on Control Panels option. Double Click on the Add/Remove Programs icon and click on the Windows Setup tab at the top of the window. Hyperterminal is located in the Communications group.

From the Shareware Archives

In Netscape, type in the URL location: ftp://ftp.ccsf.org/pub/Util/. Click the link for htpe.exe to download the program. Specify the drive and directory where you want to save the setup program. HTPE.EXE is a self-extracting archive file which contains the Hyperterminal setup program. At the DOS prompt, run HTPE.EXE to uncompress the setup program, and then type setup.exe, and the program will start the Hyperterminal installation. After the installation is complete, you may delete the file and the files for the setup program.

Using Hyperterminal

Starting HyperTerminal the First Time

The program that starts HyperTerminal is HYPERTRM.EXE. It is located under Start Menu: Programs; Accessories: Hyperterminal. The ™HYPERTRM.EXE icon looks like a computer connected to a modem. Double-click on the icon to start the modem program. The first time you start HYPERTRM.EXE, you will be prompted for country code and area code. You do not have to fill in these codes. To avoid problems with the default value for the area code, uncheck the "Use country code and area code" box at the bottom of the dialog window. Choose OK to proceed and you will not encounter this screen again. HyperTerminal will then prompt you for information on the connection you would like to establish.
  1. On the first screen, enter a name for your connection, and choose an icon to represent it. These can be anything
  2. On the second screen, enter the phone number for your new connection. When dialing into CCSF, use 239-3415 (3415 from on campus).
  3. The third screen allows you to connect to the phone number you have chosen, but it also has a host of other options. If you click on the Modify button, you can turn on the "redial" option. You can also click on the Dialing Properties button to add a digit to the number to dial out from your office, or to charge the call on a dialing card. After you are done setting these options, click on the Dial button.
  4. Once you are connected to your site (and everything works properly), go to the File menu and choose "save." This saves your settings for the current phone number permanently to your hard drive.
In general, only use HYPERTRM.EXE when you want to add a new phone number. If you save your locations after using HYPERTRM.EXE (as in step #4), your HyperTerminal directory will store unique icons for these different locations. Each unique setting you create will become a new icon specific to that new setting. To access a saved location, double-click on its icon instead of using the Hyperterm program. This will start the program with the correct settings already loaded.

For more convenience, you may want to consider making shortcuts for these icons on your desktop or the top-level of your Start menu (see Windows 95: Getting Started for more information).

Using HyperTerminal

The Button Bar

Like many Windows applications, HyperTerminal has a button bar on the top of its screen that incorporates the most often-used features of the program. The functions of these buttons are as follows:

Transfering Files to your fog Account

fog Transfer Protocols

fog is the CCSF computer that provides general email services and Internet access for much of Phelan campus. It runs HP Unix. To transfer files between fog and your PC, you use data transfer conventions known as transfer protocols. The protocols are a part of communications software. The fog computer supports both Kermit and ZModem transfer protocols. Neither of these transfer protocols should be confused with communications software packages with similar names. The instructions below describe how to transfer files using Hyperterminal and the transfer protocols available on fog.

File Transfer Basics

For the purposes of file transfers with the CCSF systems, upload means to transfer a file from your microcomputer to the mainframe; download means to transfer a file from the mainframe to your microcomputer. It is easy to get confused about which computer you need to give which command since there are two separate computers involved in a file transfer. Before you issue a send or receive command, think about which computer you're giving the command to and if you want it to send or receive the file.

Formatting

If you are uploading a text file to fog, be sure to remove all formatting (such as bold or italicized text, headers, footers) and save the file as text only or in ASCII format. You can download binary files using commands described in the downloading section below.

File Transfer Procedure

Depending on whether you will be uploading or downloading, the procedure for using ZModem or Kermit to transfer files will be different. In either case, however, you will need to establish a connection to fog with your modem and Hyperterminal software. You will also need to have the files that you want to transfer saved either in your home directory on fog (ready for downloading) or on your PC (ready for uploading).

When transfering files between your PC and fog, you will need to invoke the ZModem or Kermit command at the command prompt on fog. You must be at a prompt before taking the following steps. To return to the menu, type exit. For additional information about using your account, consult Unix: Getting Started.

Uploading from your PC

Uploading with Zmodem

  1. Type rz at the $ prompt on fog to invoke the Receive Zmodem program. ZModem should respond with the message: "rz ready. To begin transfer, type "sz file. . ." to your modem program."
  2. Click on the Send File button in the button bar or go to the Transfer menu and go to the Send File option. This will bring up a window with two selection areas in it.
  3. You may either type in the name of the file you wish to upload or click on the Browse button to find the file on your machine. Make sure the lower area says "Zmodem".
  4. Click on the Send button at the bottom of that window. Hyperterminal will then bring up another window which tells about the status of the current upload.

Uploading with Kermit

  1. Type kermit at the $ prompt on fog to invoke the Kermit program. When Kermit is running, your prompt will look like this: C-Kermit>
  2. At the Kermit prompt, if you will be transferring a text file, type set file type text. If you will be transferring a binary file, set file type binary. A text file is any file containing only characters from the basic ascii character set; a binary file is anything else. Examples of binary files include programs, graphics, and word processing documents. Press Enter after whichever of these commands.
  3. Type receive, and press Enter. Kermit should respond with the message:

    Return to your local Kermit and give a SEND command.

    KERMIT READY TO RECEIVE...

  4. Click on the Send File button or go to the Transfer menu and choose the Send File option. This brings up a window containing a line for the folder to be downloaded into and a selection box for the receiving protocol.
  5. Type in the folder you want the file to be downloaded into or click on the browse button to choose one. Then choose Kermit for the Protocol and click on the Send button at the bottom of the window.
  6. The file transfer should begin. Hyperterminal will open a window that reports details about the transfer and informs you when it is finished.

Downloading to your PC

Downloading with ZModem

  1. Type sz -e at the $ prompt on fog to invoke the send zmodem program. The "-e option tells the ZModem program to "escape all control characters", which is absolutely necessary for a reliable file transfer.
  2. Type another space followed by the name of the file you want to download. If the file does not reside in your present working directory, you will need to provide an absolute path name. Remember that Unix is case sensitive. For example: sz -e filename
  3. Press Enter. The file transfer should begin automatically. Hyperterminal will open a window that reports details about the transfer and informs you when it is finished.

Downloading with Kermit

  1. Type kermit at the $ prompt on fog to invoke the Kermit program. When Kermit is running, your prompt will look like this: C-Kermit>
  2. At the Kermit prompt, if you will be transferring a text file, type set file type text. If you will be transferring a binary file, set file type binary. Press Enter after whichever of these commands.
  3. Type send, a space, and the name of the file you want to download: send filename. Kermit should respond with the message:

    Return to your local Kermit and give a RECEIVE command.

    KERMIT READY TO SEND...

  4. Click on the Receive File button or go to the Transfer menu and choose the Receive File option. This brings up a window containing a line for the folder to be downloaded into and a selection box for the receiving protocol.
  5. Type in the folder you want the file to be downloaded into or click on the browse button to choose one. Then choose Kermit in the Use receiving protocol and click on the Receive button at the bottom of the window.
  6. The file transfer should begin. Hyperterminal will open a window that reports details about the transfer and informs you when it is finished.

Using HyperTerminal as a Telnet Client

If you have a direct internet connection or have PPP service, you can use Hyperterminal as a telnet client. This has a couple advantages over the standard Windows 95 telnet program, the best advantage being the fact that you can use file transfer protocols such as Zmodem and Kermit.
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