Image Citation Format For a Work of Art

A Painting, Sculpture or Photograph

MLA Citation Style

 

When you include an image in a paper that you are writing or as any part of an academic assignment, you need to cite it just as you would cite a source such as a book or a newspaper article. Under copyright law you are allowed to use images for educational purposes. If you are making a copy of an image for an educational project, copyright law suggests that you include more information than for a book or a periodical article, specifically a statement of use (see below). Standards for use of copyrighted images are still being established. This handout describes all the steps you can take to use an image under the “Fair Use” provisions of copyright law. For more on copyright issues, see the websites on the back of this handout.


                                               

                                                                Image 1                       Image 2

 

Citation for a Print Resource (book or periodical):

For an image copied from a print source you need to include two things

1)      a citation in the following format

2)   a statement of use.

           

Model:             Artist’s name if known. Title of artwork. Date of the artwork. Museum, collection

     or individual that it belongs to, the city where the owner is located (add this

     separately if the location is not included in the name of the owner).  Title of

     book or periodical that the image is found in.  Author of the book. Location of

     publisher: publisher, date.

Statement of Use.

 

Example, Image 1:

 

Citation:          Vinci, Leonardo da. Mona Lisa. 1503-1506. Louvre, Paris. Gardner’s Art

Through The Ages. By Helen Gardner. Fort Worth, TX : Harcourt College, 2001.

 

Statement of Use: These materials are included under the fair use exemption and are

       restricted from further use.

 

 

 

Citation for an Image from the Internet

For an image downloaded or printed out from the Internet you need to include three things:

1)      a citation in the following format

2)      the description of the image from the website: most museums and many websites require that you use the description that they’ve written to accompany their images on their website.

3)  a statement of use.

 

Model:             Artist’s name if known. Title of artwork  or description. Date of the artwork.

     Museum, collection or individual that it belongs to, the city where the owner is

     located (add this separately if the location is not included in the name of the

     owner).  Name of the website. Date accessed (day/month/year)

    URL (address for the website).

 

                        Description of artwork from the website.

                        Statement of use.

 

Example, Image 2:

           

Citation:          Pendant Mask from Benin. 16th Century. Metropolitan Museum of Art,

   New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 17 Oct. 2002

    http://www.metmuseum.org.

 

Description:    Pendant Mask: Iyoba, 16th century Edo, court of Benin; Nigeria Ivory, iron,

copper; H. 9 3/8 in. (23.8 cm) The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial

Collection, Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1972 (1978.412.323)

 

Statement of Use: These materials are included under the fair use exemption and are

                   restricted from further use.

 

 

 

Websites on Copyright and Image Citation:

 

Highlights of the Fair Use Guidelines for Educational Multimedia

Pennsylvania State University

http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/fairhigh.html

 

Copyright and Art Issues

University of Oregon

http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~csundt/copyweb

 

Image Copyright

Boston University Libraries

http://www.bu.edu/library/instruction/findimages/

           

Citing Internet Sources in Papers/Citing Graphic Images

University of Tampere, Finland

http://www.uta.fi/FAST/PP3D/citing.html#graphics

 

kconnell 10/03